Sunday, April 28, 2013

My Bargain Norwood Loom

A couple of days ago I was out running errands when I noticed a flyer for a yard sale tacked to a telephone pole. It was close to my home and I hadn't stopped at any sales yet this season, so I turned around and headed back. There were 2 small signs taped to a vehicle in front of the house. I almost missed it. Went inside and looked around. There wasn't much left in the home. It is being foreclosed and the owners are also divorcing. They seemed upbeat and still the best of friends. Anyway I am always looking for sewing items so asked the lady if she had any. No, those things went to her new apartment as she is keeping them. However she did have a loom. Well, I really don't need another loom. I have 2 floor looms already. But maybe it was a table loom? I sold my table loom and rather miss it. No, she informed me it was a floor loom. Curiosity got the better of me and I headed out to the garage to have a peek at it. I immediately recognized it to be an extremely well made loom, of nice solid cherry wood. It was very wide (50" weaving width) but folded up nicely. No, I don't need another loom. I just recently sold my lovely barn frame loom, Agda. Still, I had to ask the price. She thought about it a second and said she couldn't sell it for less than $100. $100!?!!??? Heck, you can't hardly buy a used rigid heddle loom for that. No, I didn't need another loom. But this was such a good deal. Too good, in fact. Rather like an offer I couldn't refuse. I thought if nothing else I would buy it, clean it up and re-sell it. I told the lady I would go home and ask the husband if he would mind another huge loom in the living room. I also needed his manly gorilla strength to get it home. There was no way I could stuff it in the Outback. It would have to be partially dismantled. Long story short, we had the thing in our home within the hour. We had to make 2 trips to bring it all home, but they lived just around the corner. Now I need to clean it up and get it put back together. Here are pictures of the loom from the lady's Craigslist ad. This is exactly how it looked when I found it.



Apparently this is a much sought after loom. Norwood looms are no longer made of cherry and this older style loom is much better made than the Norwood looms currently produced. It has a sectional back beam and chain tie ups. It came with the original manual, extra heddles, a Glimakra swift, warping board and 2 Leclerc shuttles with bobbins. This was my best yard sale find, ever.


10 comments:

Pearl said...

Wow...I would have bought it too! What a steal, especially with all the additional items.

I have my small table loom, but I need to find my warping board...it's around here somewhere!

crazihippichic said...

I am supposed to be selling my Schacht Wolf Pup tomorrow. I will keep my Baby Wolf but there really isn't a need for three 4 harness looms. I found a buyer who is really excited to get a small floor loom so I feel good about spreading the weaving love. Besides, it will give me spending money for my upcoming vacation. :-)

crazihippichic said...

Almost forgot, I am going to sell the warping board and swift for $100. Then it will be a FREE loom. ;-)

I already have a large Schacht warping board and a fancy floor swift.

jim Truxton said...

Your. Norwood loom was almost certainly hand made in Baldwin Michigan in early 1970's or earlier by Wallace (Wally) McGarr. I grew up in Baldwin an live there to this day. My wife was an art major at Central Michigan University with a concentration in weaving. I bought her the almost identical model for her 23rd birthday in February 1975. Wally had just sold the rights to the Norwood loom, he and his wife Melvina, designed and developed the Norwood in their shop here in Baldwin. They made models from a 24 inch 4 harness to a 72 inch 8 harness model. Wally was a patient mentor to us kids and we often picked cherries from the tree that grew alongside the loading dock at the shop. Wally, Melvina and the shop are long gone but the wonderful looms that he so lovingly built linger on.

Jim Truxton

Susan Cogger said...

to Jim,especially: I have a Norwood I bought when I graduated from college in 1971. Its been stored in garages and basements for many years. Just 5 years ago I loaned it to a friend of a friend who fixed it up and used it for several years. Now I have it back, the time to use it, and a place to use it! (Also, I grew up in Detroit.)

luvewe said...

Hi Susan,
Glad you will be able to use your loom. I just moved to a house where I will have a dedicated fiber/loom room. Just have to get the room painted. The house us a fixer but will be really lovely when we get some new paint on the walls.

joan mckenzie said...

Hi all.. I too lucked out on a cherry Norwood loom, had to be sold as the weaver was downsizing to a retirement apt - not sure how old, but likely bought in the 70's. Love it! One question - there is a chain hanging on the right hand side of the beater, with a hole for it on the side of the loom. Anyone know what it's for?? Can't figure that one out...

LlamaLinda said...

I too have a Norwood with 4 harnesses but slots for 8. Is it possible to get more harnesses and tredles?

crazihippichic said...

Sorry, LlamaLinda. Parts are no longer available.

James said...

I worked for Wally in the 1970's. My dad worked for Wally in the 1960's. We lived in Baldwin for many years, and my grandad was a banker there. Wally was a 30 year master cabinet maker and a perfectionist (as well as a hard taskmaster). His looms are works of art. Only the best straight grain mountain cherry was used. Oil finish only, as they darken with age. They are probably the best made looms in the country and you are fortunate to own one!